Priorities

Elevate

Elevating the next generation of leaders

We all have that one moment when we’re bigger and better than we thought we could be, where we exceed our expectations and achieve what we thought was impossible. The University of Wollongong has helped thousands of students find that moment. Your donation will support a range of scholarship funds to enable the University of Wollongong to foster great minds that will lead us into the future.

Alumni Funded Travel Grants

The UOW USA Foundation Alumni Travel Grants are made possible through the generosity of our alumni to enable future alumni to have an international study experience like so many of them enjoyed.

No Boulder too big

Move over Mad Men – the next Don Draper is coming, and she’s a woman. Mikayla Dennelly has trained her sights on setting the advertising world on fire, and she has the ambition, energy and drive to do just that.

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Rocking new horizons

Studying abroad can open up a whole new world of possibilities, but picking up your life and transporting it halfway across the globe can be a pretty big – and costly – deal. For Jordan Van Berkel, the first US-based student to study at UOW under the UOW USA Foundation’s new travel grants program – expecting his parents to pay his way was never on the cards.

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Transform

Transforming lives and regions through supporting researchers to focus on global challenges that affect us all.

The University of Wollongong Global Challenges Program is a major research initiative designed to harness the expertise of world-class researchers to solve complex, real-world problems to transform lives and regions.

The University of Wollongong is focusing on the big-picture problems affecting our world, under the themes of:

  • Living Well, Longer
  • Manufacturing Innovations
  • Sustaining Coastal and Marine Zones

Finding solutions to these challenges will change the way we live and interact with the world around us.

Addressing Global Challenges One at a Time

A University of Wollongong researcher is working to ensure the people of the Pacific Islands will have enough to eat for the foreseeable future after experts predicted there may not be enough fish to support the region after 2030.

Dr Quentin Hanich

Dr Quentin Hanich from UOW’s Global Challenges Research Program is leading a new project in Sustaining Coastal and Marine Zones, working with the Australian National Centre of Ocean Resource and Security and other international bodies on making sure there is food security in the Pacific region for more than the next decade. Hanich, the convenor of the Fisheries Equity Research Network (FERN), an organization conducting world-leading research into the multi-lateral distribution of conservation limits in trans-boundary fisheries, says international cooperation is essential for research to be funded and continued.

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Illuminate

Illuminate the explorations of our researchers and enable them to change lives through health and medical advancements

Science, medical and health research at the University of Wollongong is empowered by first class teaching and driven by active research and discovery towards being in the top 1% of the world. Cutting edge facilities such as the new Science Teaching facility and labs are sharpening the University’s knowledge about nanoparticles, novel medicines, cancer, mental disorders and obesity.

The University of Wollongong’s health and medical research is focussed on delivering the very best of science with a strong capacity for translation to global communities’ needs and aspirations.

The University of Wollongong cares about the way clinical healthcare is delivered to those who need it most, and committed to producing highly competent graduates for global practice.

 

Finding a cure for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) also known as Motor Neurone Disease (MND), can strike without warning and progress rapidly, devastating those in its path. The disease is incredibly complex, and scientists have long struggled to understand its origins and progression.

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